The Reading Room

Callum February 28, 2014 0
The Reading Room

ESA WCAs DOA?; WoW goes to Parliament; disability and employment – an unvarnished view; and the make-do-and-mend approach to prosthetics in Damascus…

According to a memo seen by Benefits and Work, existing Employment and Support Allowance claimants will now not be referred for repeat work capability assessments until further notice – apparently due to backlog issues…

– This week saw a Commons debate on whether the government ought to carry out a cumulative impact assessment on its programme welfare reforms, brought about by the success of the ‘War on Welfare’ Petition. On the one hand, the debate was a somewhat sparsely attended; but on the other, the motion was passed. Freelance reporter Mike Sivier was among those liveblogging what went down…

– On a related note, The Guardian‘s Amelia Gentleman profile one of the key players in the WoW petition, comedian Francesca Martinez.

– Apparently the UK’s elected representatives weren’t the only ones putting in a somewhat poor showing at a disability-themed discussion. At a US Congress hearing, Hollywood actor Seth Rogen made the case for increasing federal funding for Alzheimer’s research and care services before just two senators of out of a total of 16 who were supposed to attend…

– We’re a little late with this one, but those following the 50s-set period drama Call the Midwife and its plotline about a relationship between two ‘patients’ at a home for disabled people may be interested in this Mail interview with actors Sarah Gordy and Colin Young.

– Former software engineer and blogger ‘DavidG’ blogs thoughtfully about disability in relation to employment, serving up a trenchant critique of the government’s currently running Disability Confident campaign in the process: “It’s difficult to express how much ‘Disability Confident’ infuriates me; I think it’s a major step backwards, not forwards, and consciously intended to hide the real issue of rampant anti-disability bigotry within both management in general and human resources departments in particular.

Trigger warnings explained, courtesy of BBC Ouch’s ‘Ouchlets’ series.

A cautionary and highly informative account by disabled student Abi Palmer, of the challenges she initially experienced when attending university.

– The Independent looks ahead to the upcoming trial of Oscar Pistorius.

– In an age of relaunched gastropubs, gentrification and all-round conspicuous consumption (albeit in some parts of the country more than others), it was perhaps inevitable that a number of care homes have undergone luxury makeovers.

– As this remarkable photo gallery from CBS News vividly demonstrates, when it comes to helping people with amputations stemming from injuries sustained in what’s currently one of the world’s most turbulent conflicts, sometimes you have to make do with what you have to hand…

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